Jiu Jitsu vs InfoSec: Privileged Access

Think of the red boxes as “root.”
  • Cross-side (a.k.a. “side control”) involves the top (offensive) opponent physically occupying this space on one side of the bottom (defensive) opponent, usually with the offensive opponent’s torso in this space.
  • Knee-on-belly is just like cross-side (occupying one side between arm pit and hip), with the addition of the offensive opponent’s knee on top of the defensive opponent’s torso/belly.
  • Mount involves the top (offensive) opponent physically occupying this space on both sides of the bottom (defensive) opponent, usually with the offensive opponent’s legs/feet occupying this space.
  • North-South is like Mount, except the top (offensive) player is inverted, and as a result the top player likely controls this space with arms rather than legs.
  • Closed-Guard is the reversal of mount, where the bottom player typically has an advantage, because the bottom player’s legs are occupying this space on the top player, maintaining control.
  • Half-Guard is a position in which the bottom player can prevent the top player from fully occupying this space, while the bottom player’s leg occupies this space on one side.
  • Taking the Back requires the offensive player to use at least 2 limbs to control the spaces between the defensive player’s arm pits and hips (probably on both sides while also attacking the neck), but from behind the defensive player.
  • In the Turtle position, the top (offensive) player attempts to insert limbs into the privileged space on the bottom (defensive) player who is on the ground, but upright on all fours like a crawling turtle.
  • Chokes (strangles) may appear at first glance to not require control of this privileged space on your opponent’s body; however, this is only true if your opponent is untrained. For example, in the rear naked choke (the iconic Jiu Jitsu submission), if the attacking opponent does not control the space between the defending opponent’s arm pits and hips, then the defending opponent can turn hips and begin to escape. This space is typically controlled by the attacking opponent’s feet, referred to as “hooks.”
  • Chokes from guard (e.g. Cross Collar Chokes) involve the attacker controlling this privileged space with legs wrapped around the opponent’s torso.
  • Chokes from mount require the mount position to be held, which is the definition of this same control.
  • Triangle chokes require the attacker’s leg to occupy this privileged space on one side, and probably required dominating both sides in order to setup the technique.
  • Arm Bars (another Jiu Jitsu icon) require controlling this privileged space on both sides of your opponent to ensure your opponent does not slink out and away, turning the elbow’s angle, and nullifying the threat.
  • Kimura and Americana shoulder locks require isolating the arm, extended away from the torso, thereby exposing this privileged space for the offensive opponent to dominate while isolating the joints for the submission.
  • The venerable underhook is a clear example of how important it is to control this space on your opponent, and not let your opponent control this space on you, since its entire purpose is to put your arm in the privileged space on your opponent’s body.
  • Even leg locks require controlling the outside of the hip in order to secure the position.
Is the running man a read-only, transient, chrooted jail?

--

--

--

Red Team Leader at Fortune 1. I left my clever profile in my other social network: https://www.linkedin.com/in/malcomvetter

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

6 Top Circuit Training Workouts for Sport

Do professional sports work without fans?

A game held at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, 2019

Lionel Messi returns at Santiago Bernabeu for unleashing his magic again

World Cup Heroes: A ton for Imran Khan, victory for Pakistan

Cristiano always wants to win, he motivated us and made us react: Luka Modric

Ajinkya Rahane’s gem vital in the context of the Perth Test

The Yankees signed the veteran Ender Inciarte

Giving the Beautiful Game a “Pretty” Bad Name: A viewpoint on African Football

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Tim MalcomVetter

Tim MalcomVetter

Red Team Leader at Fortune 1. I left my clever profile in my other social network: https://www.linkedin.com/in/malcomvetter

More from Medium

The Benefit Of Tagging

Networking

Unique WAF Bypassing Methods…!!!

Top 10 cyber security Youtube Channel in2022